Prepare for the transfer of rights at age 18

When your child turns 18, you no longer have the right to make decisions for them.

This includes choices about their education plan and services.

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When a child turns 18, this is often called the age of majority. They are now considered an adult and can make their own decisions.

What if my child cannot make their own decisions? Or if I disagree with their decisions?

There are ways for parents or caregivers to get legal permission to make decisions for their children. But it's important to get it settled before your child turns 18!

The 2 types of legal decision-making status:

  • Continuing Tutorship —For kids over 15 with intellectual disabilities. This gives you the right to make decisions for your child, and you can keep these rights after they turn 18. This is easier to set up than the next option.

  • Interdiction — For kids 18 and older. This gives you the right to make certain decisions for your child, or maybe all of them. It's a complicated process and can be expensive.

 

Sources: Louisiana Division of Administration (2016), Legacy Center of Louisiana

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